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Deep Sleep

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Sleeping well?

It occurs to me sleeping is part of our ‘nutrition’, very broadly that is. So here is a good primer from our friends at TED-Ed who have animated Dr Shai Marcu’s discussion, Sleep to Remember. A five minutes preview on why sleep is important, and a comment on if we understand it better, how we might utilise sleep patterns to enhance learning.

We skimp on our sleep very easily, and eventually it does have consequences – all of them effectively decreasing our performance in virtually every aspect of our waking life. Decreased reaction speed and responses when driving, we all know about. Hampering memory creation and learning is not so readily associated with poor sleep habits.

We neglect sleep too easily, but it is critical to revitalising our circulatory systems , our immune system, and it turns out, our memory functions, or rather, consolidating new information into long term memories.

Long term memory seems to be consolidated during sleep.  It ‘moves’ from our short term memory into the areas associated with long term memory.  It is during this process that the new neural pathways are formed – a process we hear so often about.

Let’s begin…

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-benefits-of-a-good-night-s-sleep-shai-marcu

 

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